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Carpe Jugulum

Pratchett, Terry
Vampires are invited to the christening, as it were, of the royal baby in Lancre. Big mistake!

Read:

1/2005

Dodger

Pratchett, Terry
A London tosher rescues a beautiful girl from a beating at the hands scoundrels. Not a Discworld book.

Read:

8/2013

Feet Of Clay

Pratchett, Terry
Golems are holding secret meetings.

Read:

12/2004

Guards! Guards!

Pratchett, Terry
A dragon comes to Ankh-Morpork, and Vimes has to deal with it. Also, Carrot joins the force. Vimes has his hands full.

Read:

3/2015

I Shall Wear Midnight

Pratchett, Terry
The fourth Tiffany Aching novel is the best story I have read in a long time. So much to think about! I found myself weeping at times, and laughing out loud at others.

Read:

3/2011

Jingo

Pratchett, Terry
Ankh-Morpork goes to war over an island.

Read:

9/2016

Johnny and the dead

Pratchett, Terry
Johnny finds he is the only person who can see dead people at the cemtary. Very good.

Read:

10/2006

Lords And Ladies

Pratchett, Terry
Elves come to Lancre. And Elves are BAD! Very good!

Read:

3/2005

Making Money

Pratchett, Terry
Moist is maneuvered into assisting the dog that is chairman of the Royal Bank.

Words I Had To Look Up:


panopticon (pg. 56) -- an area where everything is visible.
fornication (pg. 58) -- vaulted roofing or covering. Trust me.
beccles (pg. 109) -- the small bone buttons placed in bacon sandwiches by unemployed guerrilla dentists, from The Meaning of Liff by Douglas Adams and John Lloyd.
pecunious (pg. 122) -- abounding in money; wealthy.
mountebank (pg. 127) -- any charlatan or quack.
frisson (pg. 143) -- a sudden, passing sensation of excitement; a shudder of emotion; thrill.
mendacity (pg. 148) -- 1. The condition of being mendacious; untruthfulness. 2. A lie; a falsehood.
charivari (pg. 155) -- a noisy mock serenade (made by banging pans and kettles) to a newly married couple. But from http://www.charivarirest.com/ (and nowhere else) we have 'Charivari is a French word for "beautiful good mix"', which seems more what the author was thinking of.
dunnikin (pg. 157) -- a privy.
gongfermor (pg. 157) -- the people who emptied cesspits in Medieval villages or castles.
tumbrel (pg 236) -- a farm dumpcart for carrying dung; carts of this type were used to carry prisoners to the guillotine during the French Revolution.

Quote:

"Nom d'une bouilloire! Pourquoi est-ce que je suis hardiment ri sous cape a par le dieux"? translates as "Name of a kettle! Why am I boldly laughed under cape has by the gods "? (pgs. 110-111)

Quote:

"An error, sir, is worse than a sin, the reason being that a sin is often a matter of opinion or viewpoint or even of timing but an error is a fact and it cries out for correction."

Quote:

"I can assure you that if I had, as your ill-assumed street patois has it, 'dropped you in it,' you would fully understand all meanings of 'drop' and have an unenviable knowledge of 'it.'"

Read:

11/2007

Maskerade

Pratchett, Terry
The two witches visit the Opera House in Ankh-Morpork where Agnes is attempting to be a star!

Read:

7/2005

Monstrous Regiment

Pratchett, Terry
Polly joins the army in disguise as a man. Very good.

Read:

12/2004

Nation

Pratchett, Terry
On a small island not in the Pacific Ocean a tsunami wipes out the entire population, except for one teen and shipwrecked English girl. Very good!

Quote:

"Does not happen!" -- pg. 73.

Read:

12/2009

Night Watch

Pratchett, Terry
Sam Vines goes back in time(s).

Read:

1/2005

Only you can save mankind

Pratchett, Terry
Johnny find his computer game is all too real!

Read:

10/2006

Pyramids

Pratchett, Terry
Teppic, a king's son, decides to attend Assassin school. That's the first part of the book. I wasn't thoroughly enchanted with the story, but there were some good parts. I wish my eyes didn't get tired of read paperback-size books.

The author has Teppic using crampons to climb walls. I've seen this discussed about another author, and someone on a forum said they looked in the OED to find that crampon was an archaic word for a sort of piton. Maybe. I think Prachett should have gone with piton.

Read:

12/2018

Raising Steam

Pratchett, Terry
The railroad comes to the Discworld. I got an ARC to read four weeks before it goes on sale! I enjoyed it very much, too!

Read:

2/2014

Small Gods

Pratchett, Terry
Neophyte novice Brutha comes across a turtle who is his God. Maybe.

Read:

9/2009

Snuff

Pratchett, Terry
Vimes goes on a little vacation to his wife's country home.

Words I Had To Look Up:

mutton avec no talking (pg. 93) -- It's french, means "with". Should have known this from the song lyric Voulez-vous coucher avec moi (ce soir)? from that Labelle song.
stack of wood licker wicker hurdles (pg. 50) -- On a Terry Prachett forum there is some discussion of this. Possibly a printer's error, in the Transworld edition the phrase is "wood like".

Read:

1/2013

The Amazing Maurice And His Educated Rodents

Pratchett, Terry
A talking cat and some talking rats (and a stupid boy) work a con.

Read:

3/2005

The Color Of Magic

Pratchett, Terry
The first book in the Discworld series. We learn about Rincewind, Twoflower, and the luggage.

Words I Had To Look Up:

Obloquy (pg. 23) -- The condition of one that is discredited.
Dovecote (pg. 103) -- A small compartmented raised house or box for domestic pigeons.

Read:

10/2008

Read:

1/2013
20 books displayed
[Abadzis - Alcott] [Alcott - Anderson] [Anderson - Asimov] [Atkins - Backman] [Baker - Barnard] [Barnard - Barnes] [Barnes - Barr] [Barr - Beanton] [Beanton - Beaton] [Beaton - Beaton] [Beaton - Bingle] [Birdsall - Block] [Block - Bond] [Bonham - Box] [Brackenbury - Bryson] [Bryson - Bujold] [Bujold - Caldwell] [Caletti - Card] [Card - Carson] [Carter - Chbosky] [Cheaney - Clancy] [Clare - Coben] [Coben - Colfer] [Colfer - Combat] [Conklin - Connelly] [Connelly - Cook] [Cook - Cornwell] [Cornwell - Creech] [Crew - Crusie] [Crusie - Cussler] [Cussler - Davidson] [Davidson - Dickson] [Dilloway - Dorsey] [Dorsey - Duncan] [Duncan - Elkins] [Elkins - Evanovich] [Evanovich - Fairstein] [Fairstein - Ferris] [Fforde - Flanagan] [Flanagan - Forester] [Forrest - Francis] [Francis - Francis] [Francis - Francis] [Francis - Gaiman] [Gaiman - Gash] [Gash - Going] [Gold - Grafton] [Grafton - Grant] [Grant - Greer] [Greer - Grisham] [Grisham - Haddix] [Haldeman - Hall] [Hall - Harland] [Harper - Heinlein] [Heinlein - Heinlein] [Heinlein - Henry] [Henry - Hershon] [Herzog - Hiaasen] [Hiaasen - Hillerman] [Hillerman - Holm] [Holman - Huff] [Huff - Jemisin] [Jemisin - Jones] [Jones - Kaminsky] [Kaminsky - Key] [Khoury - King-Smith] [King-Smith - Konigsburg] [Konigsburg - Kurson] [Kushner - Larsson] [Lasky - Lee] [Lee - Lescroart] [Lescroart - Lindsay] [Linsdau - Lowry] [Lowry - MacDonald] [Mackintosh - Mankell] [Manley - Martine] [Martini - Matthews] [Maupassant - McCall Smith] [McCammon - McCullers] [McCullers - Meluch] [Meluch - Monninger] [Montgomery - Moore] [Moore - Muir] [Mull - Nicholson] [Nimmo - Norton] [Norton - O'Brian] [O'Brian - O'Faolain] [O'Nan - Paretsky] [Paretsky - Parker] [Parker - Parker] [Parker - Paterson] [Patrick - Paulsen] [Paulsen - Pelletier] [Pelletier - Philbrick] [Philbrick - Powell] [Poyer - Pratchett] [Pratchett - Pratchett] [Pratchett - Pronzini] [Pronzini - Queenan] [Radlauer - Rehder] [Rehder - Riordan] [Riordan - Roosevelt] [Rose - Russell] [Russell - Sagan] [Salzman - Scalzi] [Scalzi - Scott] [Scott - Sedgwick] [See - Shields] [Shriver - Sloan] [Sloan - Sontag] [Soto - Stark] [Stark - Stephenson] [Stephenson - Stross] [Stross - Summy] [Swanson - Teague] [Telsep - Turner] [Turtledove - Valente] [Van Allsburg - Varley] [Varley - Watson] [Watson - Wells] [Wells - Westlake] [Westlake - Wilks] [Williams-Garcia - Woodring] [Woodring - Zahn] [Zevin - Zusak] 

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