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Care Of Wooden Floors

Wiles, Will
An un-named fellow goes to a distant un-named city in an un-named country to house-sit for his college friend Oskar. Stuff goes wrong. Blurb on the back from the Daily Telegraph says "Fawlty Towers crossed with Freud." Well, shit gets real on page 90, but I didn't guffaw till page 221. All that blood!
Lou Reed Sunday Morning mention on page 14, always a plus.

Read:

2/2013

Mirrorscape

Wilks, Mike
In a world where the privilege to use color must be purchased as a "Pleasure" (and there are many other "Pleasures" one must purchase, too), a young apprentice artists discovers a secret world in paintings that he can enter into. First of a series, good stuff!

Read:

1/2011

One Crazy Summer

Williams-Garcia, Rita
Three sisters go to Oakland in the 60s to visit the mother who abandoned them when they were babies. Interesting view of Black Panthers from the children's viewpoint.

Read:

2/2012

The Men Who United The States

Winchester, Simon
The trouble with this book was that every couple of pages I had to stop to look something up on the internet. Then, a few hours later, I'd get back to the book. Very slow going!

Read:

5/2017

The Professor And The Madman

Winchester, Simon
Subtitled "A tale of murder, insanity, and the making of the Oxford English Dictionary". Good book.

QUOTE:

The policeman, plodding and imperturbable, replied that if he did have another gun, perhaps he would be so kind as to keep it in his pocket for the time being.

Read:

1/2000

Detectives In Togas

Winterfeld, Henry
Students in Rome solve a mystery. First published in 1956, I'm sure I read it when I a lad. I see the author also wrote "Castaways In Lilliput", which I remember was one of my favorite books in elementary school.

Read:

10/2012

Christopher Mouse

Wise, William
Charming tale of a white mouse who has some adventures in New York City.

Read:

11/2006

The Virginian

Wister, Owen
I rember Mr. Lusk in college telling me this was the classic western story. It took me ten years to get around to reading it, but it was worth it! First published in 1902.

Read:

No date

Carry On, Jeeves

Wodehouse, P. G.
Part of the Jeeves Omnibus. Great stuff!

Words I Had To Look Up:

Eftsoons (pg. 352) -- 1. Soon afterward; presently. 2. Once again.
From the O.P. to the Prompt Side (pg. 380) -- Stage directions. The Prompt Side (P.S.) is stage left, O.P. is Opposite Prompt.
Excrescence (pg. 382) -- 1. An outgrowth or enlargement, especially an abnormal one, such as a wart. 2. A usually unwanted or unnecessary accretion
Bally (many instances, pg. 396 for one) -- Informal intensifiers; "You bally idiot!"
The Carmantle (pg. 396) -- A ship. probably fictional.
Jimmy Mundy (pg. 431) -- Not the jazz musician, probably a fictional charactor.
Mens sana in corpore sano (pg. 470) -- Latin, a healthy mind in a healthy body
Ris de veau à la financière (pg. 496) -- Calf's sweetbreads in a sauce of wine, olives, truffles and mushrooms (from Blandings: Anatole.)
Consommé pâté d'Italie (pg. 497) -- Soup of italian pasta .
Paupiettes de sole à la princesse (pg. 497) -- Rolled fillets of sole garnished with asparagus tips.
Caneton Aylesbury à la broche (pg. 497) -- Aylesbury duckling on the spit.
Lady Bablockhythe (pg. 513) -- Fictional author created by Wodehouse, see the Wikipedia List Of Fictional Books.
Gaspers (pg. 520 ) -- Slang for cigarettes, OBVIOUSLY, probably a lesser brand.

Quotes:


She was rather like one of the innocent-tasting American drinks which creep imperceptibly into your system so that, before you know what you're doing, you're starting out to reform the world by force if necessary and pausing on your way to tell the large man in the corner that, if he looks at you like that, you will knock his head off. (pg. 365)


'Mens sana in corpore sano,' observed the Prof.
'I shouln't wonder,' I said cordially. (pg. 470)


My daughter Bootles has just developed mumps. (pg. 483)


Young Bingo uttered a frightful cry of agony.
'What! Is that - that buzzard trying to pinch our cook?'
'Yes, sir.'
'After eating our bread and salt, dammit?'
'I fear, sir,' sighed Jeeves, 'that when it comes to a matter of cooks, ladies have but a rudimentary sense of morality.' (pg. 500)

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3/2008

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10/2009

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3/2010

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11/2010

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5/2012

Jeeves And The Feudal Spirit

Wodehouse, P. G.
Bertie is ordered to his aunt Dahlia's place in the country, ends up having to steal another necklace, inadvertently gets engaged to Florence Craye, and yet another run-in with Spode.

Read:

6/2012

Lord Emsworth And Others

Wodehouse, P. G.
One tale from Blandings castle, several golf stories, and I get to meet Ukridge for the first time.

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3/2013

My Man Jeeves

Wodehouse, P. G.
A small collection of Jeeves and Regi stories that I borrowed. Where is my omnibus?

Read:

8/2016

Stiff Upper Lip, Jeeves

Wodehouse, P. G.
This is part of The Jeeves Omnibus I am reading, but has been published separately, so it get its own entry. One fun thing about Wodehouse's writings is the vocabulary. Plus, I still picture Jeeves and Wooster played by Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie.

Words I Had To Look Up:

Gyves (pg. 10) -- Fetter or shackle.
Diablerie (pg. 14) -- From the Old French for Devil, but in this case might mean mischievous conduct or manner
Raisonneur (pg. 29) -- a character in a play, novel, etc. who serves as spokesman for the author's views. Advises the protagonist.
Nolle prosequi (pg. 29) -- Latin, to be unwilling to pursue.
Very white of him (pg. 38) -- Decent of him, or generous, or forgiving. Common usage in the UK in the 30s.
frisson (pg. 43) -- Shudder, thrill, moment of emotional excitement.
Amour propre (pg. 60) -- Self-esteem.
Posish (pg. 64) -- Position, as near as I can figure.
Singer midget (pg. 76) -- An entertainment troupe of the 20s or so.
Costermonger (pg. 81) -- A vendor of fruits or vegetables. (Or is it vender?)
Pukka (pg. 89) -- Genuine, first class, superior.
mal au foie (pg. 111) -- Aching liver, general malaise, hangover...
Meum and tuum (pg. 143) -- Mine and thine.
Soigne (pg. 153) -- Polished and well-goomed.

Read:

3/2008

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10/2009

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3/2010

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11/2010

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5/2012

The Golf Omnibus

Wodehouse, P. G.
This 467 page book contains 31 stories of golf, mostly related by The Oldest Member. Mostly seem to be written in the early part of the 20th century, yet stand up very well. Very good!

QUOTE:

There comes a mement in married life when every wife gazes squarely at her husband and the scales seem to fall from her eyes and she sees him as he is--one of Nature's Class A fatheads.==pg. 280

BONUS QUOTE:

..."You're sure you've no cigarettes? No? Well, how about a shot of cocaine? Out of that too? Oh, well, I'll be going, then. Pip-pep, Bates." --pg.288

Read:

7/2003

The Inimitable Jeeves

Wodehouse, P. G.
Part of The Jeeves Omnibus. I may have read this a decade ago.

Words I Had To Look Up:

Sole frite augourmet aux champignons (pg. 163) -- Babelfish sez: "Plate fried with the gourmet with mushrooms"
Rank is but the guinea stamp (pg. 173) -- Rank is just a label, and not the worth of the man (woman, in this case) under it.
Miss-in-baulk (pg. 176) -- A term from billiards indicating a penalty without loss of turn
Vincente y Blasco What's-his-name (pg. 179) -- Spanish novelist, screenwriter, film director. Blood & Sand was one of his books, but in Spanish, don't cha know?
The local Mont de Piet (pg. 184) -- in France, a public pawnshop, authorized and controlled by the government, for lending money to the poor at a low rate of interest.
Mais oui, mais ouis, c'est trop fort! (pg. 189) -- Babel Fish sez: Yes, but ouis, it is too strong!
Laudaulette (pg. 211) - Small landau; automobile with a convertible top over the back seat-
Lemon squash (pg. 211) -- A drink made of sweetened fruit juice or fruit-flavored syrup diluted with water. Lemonade?
Charlotte Corday (pg. 240) -- A figure of the French revolution, assasinated Jean-Paul Marat.
Opprobrious (pg. 273) -- Expressing contemptuous reproach; scornful or abusive:
Encomiums (pg. 280 -- Warm praise, a tribute.
pris (pg. 287) -- Loving, in love with.
Marie Lloyd (pg. 288) -- English music hall singer with reputation for racy interpetation of lyrics.
Pink 'Un (pg. 325) -- Newspaper supplement, usually sport oriented, printed on pink newsprint.
Laburnum (pg. 325) -- A small tree with yellow flowers, also called "Golden Chain".

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3/2008

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10/2009

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3/2010

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11/2010

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5/2012

How Lincoln Learned To Read

Wolff, Daniel
Explores how twelve great Americans, one of which I never heard of (Princess Winnemucca) learned the stuff they needed to know to become who they are. Very interesting!

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6/2011

DAW Science Fiction 30th Anniversary

Wollheim, Elizabeth R., editor
Nineteen pretty good short stories of science fiction. My favorite was Passage To Shola, by Lisanne Norman.

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7/2010

Snowjob

Wood, Ted
Small town police chief Reid Bennett helps out a former-Marine buddy accused of murder.

QUOTE:

"That thing's not bulletproof." "Neither are you," I reminded him...

Read:

7/1999

Beware The Four

Woodring, K. R.
An increasingly strange tale of four teen who meet in Pittsburgh, PA. Several typos on page 118.

Read:

3/2012

Beware The Four--Book 2--Abracadabra 1, 2, 3, 4

Woodring, K. R.
The four 'eventually' meet up, just to have their memories 'erased' again! "Pop" seems to be doing better, even with his 'nickname' in quotes all the time.

Read:

5/2013
20 books displayed
[Abadzis- Alcott] [Alcott- Anderson] [Andreae- Atkinson] [Atkinson- Ballard] [Balliett- Barnard] [Barnard- Barnhill] [Barr- Barr] [Barrows- Bear] [Bear- Beaton] [Beaton- Beattie] [Beattie, editor- Black] [Black- Block] [Block- Borchert] [Bosch- Brennert] [Brillant- Bryson] [Bryson- Bujold] [Bujold- Card] [Card- Card] [Card- Chabon] [Chabon- Clancy] [Clancy- Coakley] [Coben- Cole] [Cole- Collins] [Collins- Connelly] [Connelly- Cook] [Cook- Cornwell] [Cornwell- Crais] [Crais- Crumley] [Crumley- Cussler] [Cussler- David] [Davidson- Dickinson] [Dickinson- Dorsey] [Dorsey- Duane] [Duble- Elkins] [Elkins- Evanovich] [Evanovich- Fairstein] [Fairstein- Ferris] [Ferris- Flanagan] [Flanagan- Ford] [Forester- Francis] [Francis- Francis] [Francis- Francis] [Francis- Gaiman] [Gaiman- Gash] [Gash- Goldberg] [Goldberg- Grafton] [Grafton- Gratz] [Graves- Grennan] [Griffin- Grisham] [Grisham- Haldeman] [Haldeman- Hall] [Hallinan- Harte] [Hartwell- Heinlein] [Heinlein- Heller] [Heller- Henry] [Hepler- Hess] [Hess- Hiaasen] [Hiaasen- Hobb] [Hobb- Horowitz] [Horowitz- Hyman] [Ibbotson- Jocelyn] [Johansen- Kaminsky] [Kaminsky- Kelley] [Kellog- Kienzle] [King- Klise] [Klise- Krueger] [Kurland- Larsson] [Lasky- Lee] [Lee- Lescroart] [Lescroart- Little] [Little- Lowry] [Lu- Macleod] [Macleod- Marcinko] [Marcinko- Mass] [Mass- McBain] [McBain- McCrumb] [McCrumb- McNab] [McNally- Mikaelsen] [Miles- Moore] [Moore- Mullane] [Muller- Nimmo] [Nimmo- O'Brian] [O'Brian- O'Brian] [O'Brien- Owens] [Palacio- Park] [Park- Parker] [Parker- Parker] [Parker- Paulsen] [Paulsen- Peck] [Peck- Pfeffer] [Pfeffer- Posey] [Powell- Prager] [Pratchett- Pratchett] [Pratchett- Pronzini] [Pronzini- Pynchon] [Pynchon- Reeves] [Rehder- Riordan] [Riordan- Rose] [Rose- Russell] [Russell- Savage] [Savin- Schmatz] [Schmidt- Scottoline] [Scottoline- Setterfield] [Shaffer- Shute] [Sijie- Smith] [Smith- Spinelli] [Spinelli- Steinberg] [Steinhauer- Stross] [Stross- Swee] [Sweeney- Tepper] [Thompson- Turtledove] [Turtledove- Van Draanen] [Van Draanen- Veglahn] [Villasenor- Webster] [Weeks- Westlake] [Westlake- Wiles] [Wiles- Woodring] [Woodruff- Zevin] [Zimmerman- Zusak] 

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