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Speaker For The Dead

Card, Orson Scott
Ender goes the planet Lusitania to speak the life of a very cruel father that died. A very moving book, very hard to read with streams of tears flowing.

Read:

7/2002

The Gate Thief

Card, Orson Scott
Book two in the the Mithermages series. Pretty good, almost scared me we were going to lose a favorite character!

The Lost Gate

Card, Orson Scott
First book in the Mither Mages series. Danny North grew up in a compound in Virginia with his extended family who all (mostly) have magical powers. Except he doesn't seem to have any, and is looked down upon by everyone else.

Read:

7/2011

Read:

7/2012

Treasure Box

Card, Orson Scott
Quentin Fears meets and marries a wonderful woman who has a creepy family. Typical Card book, I liked it. Could one say Card is the Stephen King of fantasy?

QUOTE:

"Why aren't we drinkers, Quentin? Guys who drink can go to a bar at a time like this." "Is Swenson's open? We can eat a hundred scoops of ice cream and puke in the street." "Well, that's half the fun of drinking, at least."

QUOTE:

"I always think of books as being like people," said Sannazzaro. "Even the dull ones are worthy of decent respect, but you don't have to seek them out and spend time with them." "The disadvantage with people," said Quentin,"is you can't put bookmarks in them and set them aside till you want them again."

Read:

8/1999

It's A Crime

Carey, Jacqueline
Some accountant goes to jail for fudging the corporate books. Not a BAD book, but the ending was boring. No zinger. Read (lightly) again the next day. I bet this would be funny as a movie. I picture Will being played by the brother on New Adventures Of Old Christine.

Quote:

In one book, a mystery masquerading as science fiction, future humans snatch people from planes about to crash ... -- (pg. 221) Oh, oh, I know this one! Air Raid, by John Varley!

Words I Had To Look Up:

Mapback (pg. 12) -- Paperback mystery books published by Dell. Had a map on the back cover.
Mansard (pg. 17) -- A type of roof that has two slopes on each of the four sides. Look it up!
Propitiation (pg. 36) -- Turning away of wrath by an offering.
Banguette (pg. 53) -- An upholstered bench. Used three times in story.
Efflorescence (pg. 76) -- One could say blossoming, instead.
Gravitas (pg. 98) -- Dignity, seriousness.
Alice Paul (pg. 101) -- An American suffragist leader.
Unindicted (pg. 115) -- You don't pronounce the "c".
Thuja (pg. 118) -- A type of coniferous tree.
Cardigan (pg. 141) -- A sweater that fastens down the front. I can never remember that!
Cabriole (pg. 165) -- A very curvy kind of furniture leg.
Poussin (pg. 187) -- The painter, the chicken, or Jenny Poussin the body builder? I don't know.
Placket (pg. 188) -- Refers both to a slit in clothing and to layers of fabric which may be used to conceal such a slit. And yet I'm still not sure what it is!
piquant (pg. 194) -- Engagingly provocative.
porte cochere (pg. 196) -- A roofed structure extending from the entrance of a building over an adjacent driveway to shelter those getting into or out of vehicles.
Big bug (pg. 212) -- A wealthy or important person.

Read:

11/2008

The Devil You Know

Carey, Mike
Felix, an exorcist in present day, but slightly different, London, has run-ins with white-slavers, ghosts, archivists, and a succubus. All in a day's work.

Words I Had To Look Up::

snood (pg. 4) --
chiff (pg. 34) --
black sugar paper (pg. 61) --
Ken Wolstenholme's voice (pg. 176) --
the last two syllables of which were "bubble" (pg. 321) -- A word he didn't expect Alice to know?

Quote:

This lying thing--once you got into it, it was really a fantastic labor-saving device. (pg 232)

Read:

10/2013

The Brainstormers

Carlson editor, Dale Bick
Subtitled: Humorous tales of ingenious American boys. 20 or so stories, of them familiar to me, such as Mark Twain's Tom Sawyer, Beverly Clearly's Henry Huggins, Booth Tarkington's Penrod, Robert McCloskey's Homer Price, Keither Robertson's Henry Reed, and Carolyn Haywood's Little Eddie. Some wonderful and charming stories in here.

Read:

5/2007

The Italian Secretary

Carr, Caleb
Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson head to Edinburgh, Scotland, at the request of Mycroft Holmes to investigate two murders at Holyrood Palace.

Read:

11/2013

I am alive and you are dead - A journey into the mind of Philip K. Dick

Carrere, Emmanuel
Batshit crazy. That's what I got out of this. Plus, the man was a genius. Too genius for me. The books related by the author sounded way too complicated and boring. I LOVED the short story We Can Remember It For You Wholesale, hated the movie Total Recall. I haven't read Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep, but I loved the movie Blade Runner. For me too the most important thing I got from Casteneda was finding your spot. Highly recommend this if you are a Dick fan.

Read:

1/2006

Punk's War

Carroll, Ward
Story of naval aviation in the Persian Gulf.

Read:

4/2002

Arrest-Proof Yourself

Carson, Dale C.
Good little manual of how NOT to behave like those shirtless white guys on Cops. Should have read this a couple of years ago. The point that the justice system helps keep the poor, well, POOR, though bail, fines, and lawyer costs, was interesting. And more importantly, learning about requesting a Notice To Appear instead of being arrested seems very useful.

Read:

5/2008

All Fall Down

Carter, Ally
"An Embassy Row Novel". Going to be a series, maybe? A teen with many problems is sent to live with her grandfather, the ambassador of the United States, in a probably European country. One her many problems is that she witnessed her mother being murdered several years before, but no one will believe her. Everyone says it was just an accident.

Read:

11/2015

Black Sand

Caunitz, William J.
Good story of Greek art forgers/smugglers. Greek policeman comes to New York to help our guys. Very interesting stuff about scrolls, Alexander.

Read:

5/2001

Chains Of Command

Caunitz, William J.
Lt. Matthew Stuart of the N.Y. Police Department finds out who is killing drugs dealers.

Read:

4/2001

Cleopatra Gold

Caunitz, William J.
Undercover drug agent hopes to find the woman that murdered his father. Good story.

Read:

5/2001

Exceptional Clearance

Caunitz, William J.
Lt. John Vinda tracks a serial killer in New York. I liked the irony when he blew away the doll.

Read:

4/2001

Pigtown, A Novel

Caunitz, William J.
Gritty police procedural takes place in the Bronx involving Lt. Matthew Stuart. Very thorough, gritty.

QUOTE:

"How many ladies you dancing with these days?" "Four," Borrelli said proudly. "Doesn't it get complicated?" "Yeah, it does. But the problem is, I love 'em all." "What you gotta do is ask yourself which woman you want to spend the rest of your life cheating on."

Read:

4/2001

Suspects

Caunitz, William J.
Lt. Tony Scanlon investigates the murders of his cop friend and a candy store owner.

Read:

5/2001

Summerland

Chabon, Michael
A charming fantasy of baseball, airships, and faerie-myth. But mostly baseball. Two weeps. There is a 300 word sentence on pages 254-255 that I enjoyed very much, and read out loud to an unappreciative audience. There is a lot of reading here, and it's a 500 page book. Took me a couple weeks! Includes a map.

Quote:

"Oh, you always have a choice." Coyote said. "That's another little fun feature of life you can put down to me, if you like."

Read:

12/2007

Telegraph Avenue

Chabon, Michael
A couple of guys who run a used record store in Oakland are being threatened by a mega-store owned by a former football star who owns a zeppelin.

Read:

8/2013
20 books displayed
[Abadzis- Alcott] [Alcott- Anderson] [Andreae- Atkinson] [Atkinson- Ballard] [Balliett- Barnard] [Barnard- Barnhill] [Barr- Barr] [Barrows- Bear] [Bear- Beaton] [Beaton- Beattie] [Beattie, editor- Black] [Black- Block] [Block- Borchert] [Bosch- Brennert] [Brillant- Bryson] [Bryson- Bujold] [Bujold- Card] [Card- Card] [Card- Chabon] [Chabon- Clancy] [Clancy- Coakley] [Coben- Cole] [Cole- Collins] [Collins- Connelly] [Connelly- Cook] [Cook- Cornwell] [Cornwell- Crais] [Crais- Crumley] [Crumley- Cussler] [Cussler- David] [Davidson- Dickinson] [Dickinson- Dorsey] [Dorsey- Duane] [Duble- Elkins] [Elkins- Evanovich] [Evanovich- Fairstein] [Fairstein- Ferris] [Ferris- Flanagan] [Flanagan- Ford] [Forester- Francis] [Francis- Francis] [Francis- Francis] [Francis- Gaiman] [Gaiman- Gash] [Gash- Goldberg] [Goldberg- Grafton] [Grafton- Gratz] [Graves- Grennan] [Griffin- Grisham] [Grisham- Haldeman] [Haldeman- Hall] [Hallinan- Harte] [Hartwell- Heinlein] [Heinlein- Heller] [Heller- Herbert] [Herman- Hess] [Hess- Hiaasen] [Hiaasen- Hobb] [Hobb- Horowitz] [Horton- Ibbotson] [Ibbotson- John, and Travis S. Taylor] [Johnson- Kaminsky] [Kaminsky- Kellog] [Kellog- King] [King- Klise] [Knight- Kurson] [Kushner- latham] [Laughlin- Lefcourt] [Lefcourt- Lescroart] [Lescroart- Lobel] [Lockhart- Lubar] [Luttrell- MacPherson] [MacPherson- Marcinko] [Marsden- Mass] [Mass- McBain] [McBain- McCrumb] [McCrumb- McSwigan] [Meader- Millard] [Miller- Moore] [Moore- Mulligan] [Murphy- Nimmo] [Nimmo- O'Brian] [O'Brian- O'Brien] [O'Brien- Paolini] [Paolini- Parker] [Parker- Parker] [Parker- Parker] [Parker- Paulsen] [Paulsen- Peck] [Peck- Pfeffer] [Phelan- Powell] [Poyer- Pratchett] [Pratchett- Pratchett] [Pratchett- Pronzini] [Pronzini- Queenan] [Rankin- Rehder] [Resnick- Roach] [Roanhorse- Rose] [Rosoff- Russell] [Russell- Sawyer] [Scalzi- Schmidt] [Schmidt- Scottoline] [Scottoline- Shames] [Shames- Silverberg] [Silverberg- Smith] [Smith- Spinelli] [Spinelli- Stephens] [Stephenson- Stross] [Stross- Tapply] [Tapply- Thorp] [Thurber- Turtledove] [Turtledove- Van Draanen] [Van Draanen- Waldman] [Waldman- Wells] [Werlin- Westlake] [Westlake- Williams-Garcia] [Winchester- Woods] [Wouk- Zusak] 

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